Sunday, October 31, 2004

WEEK 7 SCOREBOARD

Well, it looks like it's going to be Harvard and Penn going up for the Ivy title in two weeks, as both teams remained undefeated in the League this weekend, although the Crimson just barely survived a nail-biter in Hanover. Here is a look at the weekend's scores:

PENN 20, Brown 16
Harvard 13, Dartmouth 12
Yale 21, Columbia 14
Cornell 21, Princeton 20

Saturday, October 30, 2004

Div. I-AA Schools Push to Keep Programs Viable

Here is an interesting article about the efforts of some Division I-AA schools to increase revenue to keep the programs viable on a national level. It also has comments from Penn's Athletic Director about the issue of the Ivies in the I-AA playoffs.

http://www.dailypennsylvanian.com/vnews/display.v/ART/41774a23486a3?in_archive=1

CURRENT IVY STANDINGS, WEEK 7 PREVIEW

Current Standings:
Team ...................Conf. Rec........... Overall Rec.
HARVARD................. 3 - 0..................... 6 - 0
PENN........................ 3 - 0...................... 5 - 1
PRINCETON ............ 2 - 1....................... 4 - 2
BROWN.................... 1 - 2........................ 4 - 2
YALE......................... 1 - 2....................... 3 - 3
COLUMBIA ...............1 - 2........................ 1 - 5
CORNELL .................1 - 2........................ 1 - 5
DARTMOUTH.......... 0 - 3......................... 0 - 6

After taking down Columbia and former title-contender Yale in weeks 5 and 6, Penn returns home to face Brown, another formidible speedbump in the drive for a third-straight title for the Quakers. Meanwhile, undefeated Harvard takes on winless Dartmouth in Hanover, while the surprising Princeton Tigers will take on the cold and the Big Red in Ithaca, and Columbia tries for its second straight victory on the road against the disappointing Yale Bulldogs.

Predictions:
PENN 23, Brown 14
Harvard 42, Dartmouth 17
Cornell 10, Princeton 7
Columbia 17, Yale 15

Sunday, October 10, 2004

IVY LEAGUE WEEK 4 SCOREBOARD

PENN 32, Bucknell 25 - 2OT
Harvard 34, Cornell 24
Yale 24, Dartmouth 14
Colgate 29, Princeton 26
Brown 27, Fordham 20 - OT
Lafayette 35, Columbia 14

Current Standings:
Team ...................Conf. Rec........... Overall Rec.
HARVARD................. 2 - 0..................... 4 - 0
PRINCETON.............. 1 - 0..................... 3 - 1
PENN ......................1 - 0..................... 3 - 1
YALE....................... 1 - 1..................... 3 - 1
CORNELL................. 1 - 1..................... 1 - 3
BROWN ...................0 - 1..................... 3 - 1
COLUMBIA............... 0 - 1..................... 0 - 4
DARTMOUTH............ 0 - 2..................... 0 - 4

The Patriot League Scholarship Experiment

As I have mentioned previously on this page, the Patriot League was established with many of the same goals as the Ivy League. While not as prestigious or well-known as the Ivy League, Patriot schools, for many years, also shunned the idea of athletic scholarships in the name of admitting only true "student-athletes" who could compete in the classroom as well as the playing field. (I have added a link to the Patriot League site for anyone interested in looking at the history of the League's formation and their principles.)

However, while the Ivy League institutions were long associated with each other even before forming an official athletic conference, the Patriot League members are solely athletic rivals, and the conference itself does not even have static membership. Some members are only in it for football (Fordham, Georgetown), while others are in it for everything *except* football (Army, Navy.) Trying to follow Patriot League membership is like trying to keep track of J-Lo's marriages, with the League allowing "associate membership" for certain sports, while other members compete in the League for all sports. American was recently added to the League, while Towson left for the Atlantic 10. The rest of the membership includes Lafayette, Lehigh, Bucknell, Colgate, and Holy Cross.

I am not arguing that the Ivies should start giving scholarships...but the Patriot League is an interesting barometer by which to judge the possibility of postseason play for Ivy League football. Scholarships or no, the Patriot League has always allowed their teams to participate in the I-AA playoffs, and with some success, as well. (Colgate played for the I-AA championship in the 2003 season.) Here is a group of schools that is just as concerned with academic integrity as the Ivies, yet they do not engage in the same hypocrisy with regard to their football programs.

Even after allowing scholarships to their athletes, Patriot schools often find themselves outmatched by Ivy League squads. It stands to reason that the Ivies could be just as competitive, if not more so, than the Patriot schools in the football playoffs.

In the last few years, the Patriot League has decided to start giving scholarships for certain sports, and apparently, its working. Here is an interesting article to that effect:

http://www.dailypennsylvanian.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2004/10/07/4164e419e15b5

Two Ivy Leaguers In Contention for I-AA's Top Award

In 1987, the Walter Payton award was established to honor Division I-AA's most outstanding player of the year. Payton, who played for I-AA Jackson State, went on to become one of the greatest players in NFL history.

This year, two Ivy League players are in the running for the award: Alvin Cowin, a Senior QB from Yale, and Clifton Dawson, a Sophomore RB from Harvard.

Click here to read the complete story on these two exceptional *non-scholarship* athletes, who may very well be the best players in the nation not able to prove their greatness on a national, postseason stage.

http://www.sportsnetwork.com/default.asp?c=sportsnetwork&page=cfoot2/indexpic.htm

Friday, October 08, 2004

A Quick History Lesson

Just for any newcomers out there, here is a quick history lesson on the Ivy League, Division I-AA, and why we are in the predicament we are in right now....

  • The Ivy League is comprised of eight schools: Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Pennsylvania, Princeton, and Yale.
  • The "Ivy League", despite many stories or rumors about its origins and creation, is really an athletic conference, formally created in 1954 with the Ivy Group Agreement. Rather than being administered by the athletic directors of the respective schools, the Ivy League is governed by the Council of Ivy Group Presidents.
  • The Ivy Group Agreement of 1954 was an extension of a 1945 pact that only governed the eight schools' football programs.
  • Although the Ivy League programs competed on the Division I level for most of their histories, they decided to stop giving athletic scholarships in the name of more academic integrity. All Ivy programs still compete at the top level of their respective sport with the exception of football, which is at the I-AA level. (NOTE: The I-AA level was not created until 1978, and is only for football).
  • All (or virtually all) I-AA football programs give scholarships. Until recently, only the Patriot and Ivy Leagues did not give athletic scholarships, but Patriot member Holy Cross was instrumental in making changes in that policy, and now I'm pretty sure all Patriot schools give scholarships for football.
  • Many schools that you would think of as having big-time programs in other sports have I-AA football programs. It has to do with school size, facilities, and other factors. Some examples of I-AA schools include Georgetown, UMass, Delaware, Villanova, Lehigh, Colgate, Fordham, as well as all of the traditionally Black colleges and universities. (However, Florida A&M has petitioned to become the first traditionally Black school to play in I-A).
  • Some notable I-AA alums in the pros include: Jerry Rice, Steve McNair, Dexter Coakley, and Jay Fiedler.
  • Perhaps the most important factoid you need to know is this: The Ivy League competes in 33 NCAA sports at the Division I level....all programs participate in their sport's championship EXCEPT for football! Why? This makes NO SENSE!!! This will be explored soon.....

Thursday, October 07, 2004

NCAA Sees Penn as I-AA Contender

For you doubters out there, here is a link to the NCAA Division I-AA Football Preview for the 2004 season, listing Penn as one of ten teams that "could challenge for the title this year." This, despite their non-scholarship, non-playoff status. Penn is compared here with major powerhouse programs in I-AA.

http://www.ncaasports.com/football/mens/story/7619724

Wednesday, October 06, 2004


Beautiful, Historic, Franklin Field Posted by Hello

Bringing Glory Back To Franklin Field

See the article that inspired my quest.....

David Burrick: Why fans ignore Quakers football

http://www.dailypennsylvanian.com/vnews/display.v/ART/4163797e76348